Blacktown Interior, Upper-Queen Street (2001-2005)

Blacktown Interior was an installation of sculptural works privately exhibited at the flat I was living at, on Upper-Queen Street, Auckland Central in 2003. This video work is one of the only remaining developments from the Blacktown Interior project. It was completed between 2001-2005, as I looked to learn the processes of 3D modeling and animation.

Read excerpts from the essay Blacktown Interior. (Link temporarily inactive)

On Furniture

I explored the construction of shrines, to the excess of the city, elaborate interior spaces built for the housing of Maori texts – as a locus for fetishistic rituals, affirming a sense of cultural unity based on the collection of commodities. A collection of Maori things- souvenir store icons, brought together- for the artifice of the shrine I used furniture. However I felt the metaphor was inappropriate the – the ingestion of collected texts from the exterior brought into the interior of the domestic interior, then into the structure of furniture- thus seemed to express an ‘ingestion’. With the potentiality to only ingest the exterior/outside, and to exempt the inside from being active in the reframing of it’s texts. I found this metaphor inappropriate, so sought to expand upon it.

From: Blacktown Interior (2003)

I decided to explore further a notion of furniture as a support for the banal and everyday and an economy between this support and the support implict within a sense of cultural inclusivity. Furniture becomes a location of rest, a pause and temporal storage for texts, for things, as an intermediary site while such things are not in use – a site contingent on its relationship with the domestic location. The domestic site in which I live becomes a storage site also, for a living with only fragile borders that separate it from the momentums that are exterior. A door on the street before Upper Queen Street, two windows that a landlord refuses to buy curtains for are large – and of a kind used to display wares. So as to implement a separation between public and private I have used two backing boards, one from a wardrobe, the other from a cabinet.

From: Blacktown Interior (2003)

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